Category Archives: Seasonal Regimen

  • Ayurvedic Dietary Rules – 4

    Posted on by Dr. Shweta Labde

    After the previous two dietary rules Ushnam ashniyat and Snigdham ashniyat, comes the third and important dietary  rule – which we usually ignore most of the times – Matravat ashniyat. The immediate question coming to the mind is, What is Matravat ? The literal meaning is ‘Desired quantity’. The quantity of food desired (required) by the body, with respect to age, one’s agni, type of food to be eaten, and not upon ‘xyz’ calories/units of particular food constituents. A]  Matra maybe classified as quantity of a single food item or quantity of all the items in a meal. Quantity of an individual food item differs with its properties and prakriti of the individual; but, yes Ayurveda specifies the matra in a particular meal – Ayurveda explains, one should not eat meals till contentment (full stomach), for instance if you divide the stomach into three parts grossly – 1 part should be for solid foods like roti, rice, bread, veggies/meat. 1 part for liquids which can include dals, buttermilk, soups and water,etc. And the last part should be left
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    Posted on by Dr. Shweta Labde
  • Makar Sankrant – The Ayurveda perspective

    Posted on by Dr. Shweta Labde

    India is a land of festivals. We Indians celebrate all these festivals with lots of fun and enthusiasm. Ayurveda explains 6 rutus (seasons) where every 2 rutus clubbed together,  explains three seasons in a year as per modern calender. All these festivals are associated with various rituals and tasty delicacies with slight variations as per the state and customs carried there. It wont seem an exaggeration if I say, we almost have one festival every month. eg- We have Ganpati festival associated with Modak in varsha rutu (monsoon), then we have Dasshera followed by kojagri pournima, Sharad rutu (october heat) where in we relish flavoured milk cooled down by moonlight. Diwali – where we enjoy various sweet and salty recepies fried, baked, roasted all yummy and healthy comes in Hemant rutu (beginning of winter). And With the start of the new year comes Makar Sankranti, shishir rutu (peak of winter). Now one may wonder, why so many festivals alongwith so many other celebrations in a year? Din’t our forefathers have any work to do? Others may
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    Posted on by Dr. Shweta Labde
  • Ayurvedic Dietary Rules -3

    Posted on by Dr. Shweta Labde

    In the last blog we started with the Aharvidhi vidhaan, where we discussed about the first dietary rule Ushnam ashniyat, now we shall know more about the second rule – 2. Snigdham Ashniyat –  Now we all know ashniyat means to eat, we shall know what exactly snigdha means. A generalized translation of the word ‘snigdha’, may mean oily, (I can notice most of yours eyebrow raised by the word ‘Oily’, and the immediate pop ups into the mind – weight gain, cholestrol, acidity, and lot more). As mentioned, that would be a mere translation. The word ‘snigdha’ in Ayurveda has various shades – it explains moistness of the food, food texture and quality which will please the body and mind, definitely it also specifies use of oil or ghee in desired proportion which shall provide the necessary lubrication to the body internally and externally, and not the food – deep fried in oil or ghee. Benefits of Snigdha Bhojan (food) – Food with proportionate use of oil, ghee or water, provides proper texture and taste to
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    Posted on by Dr. Shweta Labde
  • Jaggery – The natural and healthy sweetener

    Posted on by Dr. Shweta Labde

     Jaggery, commonly known as Gud in hindi and Gul in marathi, is an easily available, cheap, very beneficial and nutritious item in the grocery list. It is a storehouse for many nutrients. Due to its Ushna (hot) potency and snigdha property it pacifies vata, It strengthens bones and joints, allievates backache and bodyache. Jaggery being easy to digest, also kindles digestive fire, aids digestion and helps in constipation. It helps to increase haemoglobin content of the body, and is a rich source of iron, calcium magnesium and potassium. The most common cold and cough problems faced during winter, is taken care of by jaggery due to its ushna, snigdha, vataghna guna. It is a good natural sweetener, immunity builder, and a natural health tonic. Jaggery can be used in various food and medicinal preparations. It can also be had raw with peanuts or piece of coconut. It is advised to use organic Jaggery for desired benefits.

    Posted on by Dr. Shweta Labde
  • Dry Cough

    Posted on by Dr. Shweta Labde

    Coughing is generally a reflex action to clear of the irritant body or mucus from the throat, but the repetitive bouts of cough should be considered as a clinical condition. The cough can be a result of lower or upper respiratory tract infection, flu or cold (viral or bacterial). Generally cough is classified and treated depending upon the symptom – cough with mucus expectoration and without expectoration i.e. Dry cough. Persistent dry cough can really be very irritating and troublesome. According to Ayurveda classification dry cough falls in vataj kaas category – meaning cough or kaas with dominance of Vata dosha. Patient coughs for a longtime but with very little or no mucus expectoration. Dryness of throat and mouth. Headache,chest and backache can arise on persistent coughing. Continuous dry cough bouts can also cause fatigue and weakness. itchy and sore throat. Dry cough or Vataj cough is aggravated by cold and dry air, cold, stale, processed and fried foods, excess travelling, and over exertion. Vata aggravating foods and activities like packaged food, fermented food, uncooked
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    Posted on by Dr. Shweta Labde
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